Less is More: The Evolution of my Aesthetic Preferences

Less is More: The Evolution of my Aesthetic Preferences

Universally accepted socio-cultural codes are inherently cross-generational.  They have always existed, whether firmly stated, gently whispered, or clearly implied.  Interest in the complex interrelationship between fashion, art, and society began very early and continue to evolve.  Although I am from southern California, I have spent a significant amount of time living abroad learning how to adapt – and not assimilate – my own preferences to those of the culture that embraces me.

Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961). Image Credit: Fashion Gone Rogue

I am always eager to find a way to merge my interests into a cohesive, external shell that most accurately reflects my authentic self.  The iconic Coco Chanel and Audrey Hepburn have always provided inspiration for me with their natural grace and understated elegance.  I tend to agree with the renowned architect, Mies van der Rohe: “Less is More”.

Karl Lagerfeld, Sketch for Chanel.

Over the years, I have become more flexible and tastes have been gently transformed without sacrificing my fundamental values.   Having lived in a multitude of international cities including Paris, Florence, Berlin, Toronto, and London, I have been fully immersed in other societies, appreciating the subtle nuances of cultural norms, linguistic codes, and acceptable attire while still protecting my core sensibilities.  Therefore, I am always eager to find a way to merge those interests into a cohesive, external shell that most accurately reflects my authentic self.

Hermès, F/W 2014/2015. Image Credit: vogue.fr

When I am at home in southern California, I am encapsulated in a sunny world of cool, ocean breezes and beautiful, sandy beaches.  Therefore, I tend to adopt a minimalistic approach.  It is only appropriate that I slip into an airy sundress and sandals.  However, working at the Opéra national de Paris – Palais Garnier, and now at Rémy Cointreau on Haussmann Boulevard in Paris, requires a more conservative approach with elements of controlled creativity.

Karl Lagerfeld, Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2017. Image Credit: vogue.fr

 

Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2017. Image Credit: vogue.fr

Although I was raised in a family with strong ties to the Armed Forces, I ultimately attended a Quaker boarding school.  The complex interrelationship between the individual, socially acceptable dress codes, and attitude were rather dramatic, to say the very least.  At home, we fervently adhered to the old adage, “Cleanliness is next to godliness,” in all aspects of life.  There was no higher compliment than to be referred to as someone who was “neat and tidy”. Even now, I feel most comfortable in clothes that are easy to wear with simple, clean lines and monochromatic colors.

Hermès Paris Fashion Week SS 17. Image Credit: vogue.fr
Hermès Paris Fashion Week SS 17. Image Credit: vogue.fr

My adopted Quaker environment was diametrically opposed to strict military standards, both in lifestyle and ideology.  Fashion was relatively non-existent, but individual expression, creativity, and curiosity were highly laudable traits.  At first, I was uncertain about the unabashed enthusiasm that erupted over the mixing of fabrics, textures, colors, and proportions.  I found myself questioning the taste and sanity of classmates and professors who seemed to have reached a soothing state of nirvana in their wrinkled trousers, colorful scarves, and comfortable Birkenstocks.

Karl Lagerfeld’s Haute Couture Spring Collection held at the Grand Palais Paris is January 2017 is an accurate reflection of my aesthetic preferences with the feminine silhouettes and cinched-in waists. The luxurious fabrics and embellishments elevate the ensembles. Yet, there is something quite conservative and inherently minimalistic about the heritage collection.

Karl Lagerfeld. Chanel Haute Couture, Spring 2017. Image Credit: vogue.fr

 

Karl Lagerfeld. Chanel Haute Couture, Spring 2017. Image Credit: vogue.fr

Trends have never peaked my curiosity, but the timelessness and enduring traits of an exceptional product never cease to inspire me.  It has been a natural progression that has attracted me to internationally renowned French heritage brands which reflect discreet, understated elegance.  Hermès, Louis Vuitton, and Chanel are clear examples of brands which value quality, excellence, and craftsmanship while providing effortless style.

Karl Lagerfeld. Chanel Haute Couture, Spring 2017. Image Credit: vogue.fr

 

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